Where is the Media Free?

When examining both Chinese and American free speech laws, numerous complexities arise. The Chinese government tries to use the “privilege” of free expression to seem less totalitarian. Still, they practice complete control and censorship over what common citizens might think or say. All content is monitored and censored by the government their speech laws areContinue reading “Where is the Media Free?”

A More Direct Comparison

We discussed some history, looking at how the governments have shaped modern practices in both countries. We looked at modern conditions. Let’s take a moment to revisit some key differences between American and Chinese free speech practices. Freedom of Opinions As mentioned before, the Chinese are only allowed access to sites that are regularly monitoredContinue reading “A More Direct Comparison”

China: Missing Information?

In an article for The New York Times, Beijing writer Hung Huang explains that their media censorship has in some respects loosened up. Specifically, she claims that her magazine has not been censored for the past four years, even though they have published some fairly sexual photoshoots. Because of this, she argues that Chinese citizensContinue reading “China: Missing Information?”

American Freedom and Misinformation

How Much is too Much? Clearly, the constitutional right of free speech reigns supreme in America. But how much freedom is too much? Some argue the autonomy of the American media has led to issues being blown out of proportion. Further, they propose that many American citizens are misinformed. In an article for The WashingtonContinue reading “American Freedom and Misinformation”

The Espionage Act vs. Free Speech

The Pentagon Papers Even though there is risk involved when releasing classified information, the First Amendment typically trumps the Espionage Act. The Pentagon Papers case set the precedent. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara commissioned the papers, and they were officially titled “Report of the Office of the Secretary of DefenseContinue reading “The Espionage Act vs. Free Speech”

Legal Action

In China Chinese government uses legal punishment to silence dissenders. David Volodzko, national editor for The Korea JoongAng Daily, reported that “in 2005, China had 32 journalists arrested,” and “ten years later, that figure was up 65 percent” (“Is Free Speech in China Really Getting Better?” par. 5). Looking at these statistics, it is clear to see whyContinue reading “Legal Action”

Violence in the Media

In China When riots broke out in Hong Kong, people on mainland China had no idea. The Chinese government censored their news to ensure their citizens would remain uninformed. According to USA TODAY journalist Calum MacLeod, the 2014 Umbrella Revolution saw Hong Kong citizens shielding themselves from tear gas and pepper spray behind umbrellas asContinue reading “Violence in the Media”

Laying the Framework: How Does Free Speech Look?

In China In China, freedom of expression is viewed as a privilege, not a right. The Congressional-Executive Commission on China explains that this privilege is only extended to elite members of Chinese society. The “free-speech elite” is made up of citizens who hold prominent financial, political, and academic careers (“Freedom of Expression in China” par.Continue reading “Laying the Framework: How Does Free Speech Look?”

Freedom of Speech

The Series Freedom of speech and of the press has long been considered part of America’s Constitutional, inalienable rights. These rights are not incorporated in every culture. I wanted to develop a series exploring the differences between the expression and history of free speech laws in our American culture, especially compared to a country withContinue reading “Freedom of Speech”